Live Cell Microspocy​

Detecting Your Body’s Imbalances

Live blood analysis differs from traditional medical blood testing in which preserved blood is sent to a laboratory for an “autopsy” and analyzed for chemical composition and cell counts.  Live blood work involves magnifying a single living drop of blood, taken from a fingertip prick to 1,000 times or more under a microscope. The cells of the blood live for at least 20 minutes and with the aid of a video camera, are observed on a monitor, revealing certain subtleties missed by laboratory blood tests. 

Although live cell microscopy was invented over 140 years ago, only with the recent advent of a video camera and monitor, did it become possible for the client to become involved by observing the immediate test results on the screen. This expanded technology is mainly responsible for the growing popularity of a live blood test. 

Nutritional Indicators

Live blood analysis can reveal distortion of red blood cells which reflect nutrition status, especially low levels of iron, protein, vitamin B12, folic acid and fatty acids. Incomplete or delayed digestion of fats and proteins can also be observed. In addition, liver stress and undesirable bacterial and fungal by-products may be revealed.

The live blood thus acts as an educational “feedback mechanism”, motivating people to improve their diet, perhaps with the addition of nutritional supplements. Positive changes in the structure of the blood cells can be viewed over time, usually a period of months, as improved nutrition impacts the blood.  

In laboratory tests, preserved blood must be stained in order to see certain cellular structures. When live blood is viewed with a darkfield condensor, the process gives a highly contrasted image so that live material can be easily viewed. 

This darkfield microscopy may be of value in the early assessment of environmental sensitivity, imbalanced terrain, compromised immunity and other conditions, months or years before traditional medical diagnosis.

The microscopist can look at live blood through various lenses, including darkfield and brightfield, both of which provide a different illumination to help evaluate the same blood specimen. 

Test Offered Across Canada 

According to the microscope research of Gunther Enderlein, tiny life forms called protits undergo a life cycle and can reveal much information concerning the state of one’s health and immunity.

Although the diseases themselves cannot be actually seen under a microscope, live blood analysis allows altered “blood ecology” patterns to be observed. These patterns allow disease imbalances to occur over time and the idea is to modify and improve suboptimal patterns before serious trouble such as disease arises. 

Microscopic analysis of live blood is very popular in Europe, especially Germany. In Canada, live blood and darkfield microscopy are gaining in popularity and are now available in almost every city. Live blood work is not covered by provincial health insurance, but when performed by Certified Nutritional Practitioner most benefits will cover it. The cost of the analysis ranges from $60. to $200. Since a national referral list of practitioners is not yet available, Better Health Clinic offers this service at the Clinic in Onangeville.

About the author ...

Hannah discovered her love of food and nutrition working in the restaurant industry. Over the past 15 years, she has worked with all aspects of food, from creating meal plans, presenting it, purchasing it, knowing what it does to our bodies, understanding the environmental aspect of it, understanding what our bodies require, and cooking it. In these roles accompanied with her diploma in Holistic Nutrition she is ready to help all ages achieve their health goals and teach simple understanding of holistic nutrition.

5 Easy Steps to Keep Your Thyroid Healthy

January is Thyroid awareness month. How often does this question pass through your mind? “I wonder what I could do to keep my thyroid healthy” this article is going to give you 5 easy steps to do to support your awesome little thyroid gland.

What does my thyroid do for me?

The thyroid gland produces hormones that regulate the body’s metabolic rate as well as heart and digestive function, muscle control, brain development, mood, and bone maintenance. Its correct functioning depends on having a few good health practices.

5 Natural Ways to keep you’re thyroid healthy:

The No. 1 natural remedy you need to start to support the thyroid is ashwagandha, which has been proven to heal thyroid and adrenal issues. Ashwagandha is known as an adaptogenic herb. Adaptogen herbs mean they help you adapt and deal with stress, and ashwagandha has been used for thousands of years in Chinese medicine. It has also been shown to greatly benefit hyper and hypothyroid symptoms.

The No. 2 thing you should consider adding into overall improve your thyroid function is selenium. The benefits of selenium are critical — actually, selenium has very powerful antioxidant-like functions. In fact, studies have shown that selenium helps balance out T4 in your body hormones, so again, taking a therapeutic dose of selenium every day has also been shown to benefit thyroid function. Here are some foods high in selenium:

  • Brazil nuts
  • Yellowfin tuna
  • Cooked halibut
  • Grass fed beef
  • Beef liver
  • Turkey
  • Chicken
  • Pastured eggs
  • Spinach

The No. 3 next thing you want are certain types of B vitamins if you want to improve thyroid function. There are two specifically I want to mention: thiamine and vitamin B12. Thiamine and vitamin B12 are two B vitamins you need that can actually improve thyroid function. If somebody is on a vegan or vegetarian diet, they’re absolutely going to be deficient in vitamin B12 and also are likely to be deficient in thiamine as well. Vitamin B12 benefits thyroid health by balancing hormones naturally and treating chronic fatigue syndrome. Some of the top B12 foods include:

  • Beef liver
  • Sardines
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Raw cheese
  • Lamb
  • Wild salmin
  • Pastrued eggs

The No. 4 most important thing to help your thyriod are Probiotics. Probiotics are critical for digestive function. In fact, thyroid conditions have also been linked to a health problem called leaky gut syndrome. Leaky gut is where a protein like gluten can leak through the gut, get in the bloodstream and cause inflammation throughout the body, but also it can cause inflammation of the thyroid gland. Thus, healing leaky gut syndrome is important and probiotics are the No. 1 supplement for that. Some foods that naturally contain probiotics are:

  • Kefir
  • fermented vegetables
  • Organic yogurt
  • Raw cheeses

Finally, the No. 5 best thing to do to support the thyroid gland is lower stress! Stress will take down even the healthiest person. The thyroid gland is one of the important glands in the body that helps you deal with stress. very important to keep stress levels down to ensure your thyroid stays happy. look at stress management practices like meditation and deep breathing.

About the author ...

Hannah discovered her love of food and nutrition working in the restaurant industry. Over the past 15 years, she has worked with all aspects of food, from creating meal plans, presenting it, purchasing it, knowing what it does to our bodies, understanding the environmental aspect of it, understanding what our bodies require, and cooking it. In these roles accompanied with her diploma in Holistic Nutrition she is ready to help all ages achieve their health goals and teach simple understanding of holistic nutrition.

Eat Your Greens Detox Soup

detox soupThis recipe for “Eat Your Greens Detox Soup,” comes from The Oh She Glows Cookbook by Angela Liddon.

This soup is great for cleansing and detoxifying your body, especially before or after the indulgent holiday season. It’s packed with immunity-boosting ingredients like broccoli, ginger, mushrooms, kale, nori, and garlic.

  • 1 1⁄2 teaspoons coconut oil or olive oil
  • 1 sweet onion, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 cups sliced cremini or white button mushrooms (about 8 ounces)
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 2 cups chopped broccoli florets
  • Fine-grain sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 1⁄2 to 3 teaspoons grated peeled fresh ginger
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1⁄8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 5 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 large nori seaweed sheets, cut into 1-inch strips (optional)
  • 2 cups torn kale leaves
  • Fresh lemon juice, for serving (optional)

In a large saucepan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes, until the onion is soft and translucent.
Add the mushrooms, carrots, and broccoli and stir to combine. Season generously with salt and pepper and sauté for 5 minutes more.
Stir in the ginger, turmeric, cumin, and cinnamon and sauté for 1 to 2 minutes, until fragrant.
Add the broth and stir to combine. Bring the mixture to a boil and then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the vegetables are tender, 10 to 20 minutes.
Just before serving, stir in the nori (if using) and kale and cook until wilted. Season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice, if desired.

About the author ...

Stacey Ayres, Osteopath Manual Practitioner, Registered Massage Therapist, is the owner of Better Health Clinic, She is a member of the Canadian College of Massage Therapists of Ontario as well as the Ontario Association of Osteopathic Manual Practitioners. Stacey has a particular interest in pediatrics, chronic pain, post trauma and surgery rehabilitation, and fertility.

Detoxing and Cleansing

March is Liver and Kidney Health Awareness Month!

Your liver and kidneys are vital organs.  They process and filter everything that you put into your body.  If your liver and kidneys are healthy, then you will be too.  Periodically, these organs need some extra support and a bit of a rest.

Let’s look at the facts and history regarding detoxing and cleansing.

Spring is the time to renew, refresh and do some spring cleaning.  In holistic and natural health, spring is thought to be a good time to detoxify or cleanse the body.  The concept is not new.  Historically throughout the ages, there is reference to fasting and cleansing.  Many cultures and religions observe periods of dietary change and elimination.  These days there are juice cleanses, herbal detox programs, cleansing diets, and much more.

The choices are endless and the information is confusing to many people and more information does not make the decision easier!

  • Is detoxing necessary for everyone?
  • Is detoxing safe for everyone?
  • Is a cleansing diet better than fasting?
  • Can detoxing or cleansing be harmful?
  • Are there any contraindications for individuals with health conditions or those taking medications?

Seek the advice of a professional who can assess your individual needs and help you with a plan.  I don’t try to assess and repair my automobile, because I am clueless in that area – I go to a great mechanic who is my auto expert.  A nutritionist is a body systems expert.  Consider booking an appointment so that we can meet and discuss your journey to “Optimal Wellness”.

About the author ...

Kathy Shackleton, is a Holistic Nutritionist and Health Educator practicing in Dufferin County Ontario. She is passionate about using food as medicine and medicine as food. In her spare time Kathy enjoys hiking, cooking, reading, yoga and volunteering with local groups and events such as Savour Fair which raises funds for students of agriculture and creates community awareness for local, clean food.

Gluten …

Have we talked enough about gluten and gluten-free?  Maybe not!

Not all gluten free foods are “health giving”

Just a few thoughts to share. Gluten free is trendy to some; and a necessary lifestyle to others.

Anyone can benefit from a break from gluten.

For certain people, gluten free is not an option. Those with Celiac Disease or serious Gluten Intolerance must live gluten free or their   well-being is severely compromised.

The word “gluten” from latin translates as glue. This is the key point. Gluten holds baked goods together and thickens soups and sauces. When gluten is removed, other methods of ways of “gluing” are required.  This could mean adding more sugar or gluten free white pasty flours that provide no nutritional value.                                                                  

With a little work and knowledge, gluten free baking and cooking can be delicious, nutrient rich and have a perfect texture.  Some of the “gluten free” products on the grocer’s shelves are not good for you. Fiber is often lacking, and sugar and sodium content is high.  If you are interested in healthy, nutrient dense gluten free baking, cooking, and store bought choices; I can help.

Please read labels carefully and make wise choices.   For breads and crackers, I like to see per serving: 3 grams of fiber and 0 grams sugar. 

Read more on how to understand our nutritional labels here:   http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/nutrition-labels-to-be-easier-to-read-health-canada-proposes-1.2706310

About the author ...

Kathy Shackleton, is a Holistic Nutritionist and Health Educator practicing in Dufferin County Ontario. She is passionate about using food as medicine and medicine as food. In her spare time Kathy enjoys hiking, cooking, reading, yoga and volunteering with local groups and events such as Savour Fair which raises funds for students of agriculture and creates community awareness for local, clean food.

The benefits of steel cut oats

Steel cut oats are my first choice for cooked oats cereal.

Steel cut oats are whole grain groats (the inner part of the oat kernel), which have been cut into a few smaller pieces. Unlike rolled oats or instant oats, they haven’t been partially or fully precooked, meaning they retain more of their natural taste, texture and nutrients. As far as calories, carbs, fiber they are similar to old fashioned rolled oats, however steel cut oats “stick to the ribs” a little better..

Steel cut oats have 7 grams of protein per dry ¼ cup (44 grams) serving, so the oats alone are a good start for a high-protein breakfast.

Oats, oat bran, and oatmeal contain a specific type of fiber known as beta-glucan. Since 1963, study after study has proven the beneficial effects of this special fiber on cholesterol levels.  Oat bran has not been removed in steel cut oats.

Oats are naturally free from gluten, but might contain traces of gluten, depending on the processing from farm to package.

If you need gluten free, look for it on the label.

Steel cuts oats are a great source of nutrition and are most certainly a super food.

Links to help you on the path the optimal health

About the author ...

Kathy Shackleton, is a Holistic Nutritionist and Health Educator practicing in Dufferin County Ontario. She is passionate about using food as medicine and medicine as food. In her spare time Kathy enjoys hiking, cooking, reading, yoga and volunteering with local groups and events such as Savour Fair which raises funds for students of agriculture and creates community awareness for local, clean food.